Lethal Beauty: Design Elements in Samurai Suits of Armor

  • Denver Art Museum 100 West 14th Avenue Denver, CO, 80204 United States

Denver Art Museum's Asian Art Association welcomes Andrea Marks.

Helmet in dragonfly shape, 17th century, iron, lacquer, wood, leather, gilt pigments, silk, papier-mâché. Minneapolis Institute of Art. The James Ford Bell Foundation Endowment for Art Acquisition and gift of funds from Siri and Bob Marshall 2012.31.1a-c.

Helmet in dragonfly shape, 17th century, iron, lacquer, wood, leather, gilt pigments, silk, papier-mâché. Minneapolis Institute of Art. The James Ford Bell Foundation Endowment for Art Acquisition and gift of funds from Siri and Bob Marshall 2012.31.1a-c.

Japanese suits of armor stand out among the armor of other world cultures because of their flashy, colorful appearance and exquisite design. The armor most often seen in exhibitions or auctions ranges in date from the 16th to the 19th centuries. During this time a large industry of samurai-oriented crafts catered to a significant part of Japanese society.

This lecture by Dr. Andreas Marks, Curator of Japanese and Korean Art, Minneapolis Institute of Art, will focus on the design of suits of armor and will especially address helmet forms and often found elements like demonic Chinese lions. Reception following.

Doors open at 6 pm

Free admission; but make a reservation before 4 pm on April 7.

For details, email Blittle@denverartmuseum.org or call 720-913-0040.

Sponsored by the William Sharpless Jackson Jr. Endowment.